Anna Sewell
Black Beauty
"I never yet could make out why men are so fond of this sport; they often hurt themselves, often spoil good horses, and tear up the fields, and all for a hare, or a fox, or a stag, that they could get more easily some other way; but we are only horses, and don't know" (Black Beauty)

Anna Sewell was born on March 20th 1820, in Norfolk in England and was crippled while still very young. As such, she spent much time on horse-drawn carriages that allowed her some freedom of movement, and she developed as a result a great concern for the proper treatment of animals. Sewell's mother was a successful writer for children, and Sewell spent time editing the texts and becoming acquainted with writing.

Sewell wrote only one book: the famous and enduringly popular Black Beauty (1877). She lived as an invalid for most of her existence, and Black Beauty - the tale of a mistreated horse with a happy ending - was written entirely in the last decade of her life when she was confined to her house. The story came from the horse's mouth, literally, as the horse spoke of extremes of joy and suffering. It was perhaps this humanising of the beast that made it such as success both as a book and as a catalyst for change in people's attitudes towards animals. There is a full biography by Susan Chitty called The Woman who wrote Black Beauty: A Life of Anna Sewell (1971).
Anna Sewell on the web A detailed biography on Anna Sewell
Be more creative Creative Quotations from Anna Sewell

  By PanEris using Melati.

  Back Home Email this Search Discuss Bookmark  
Copyright: All texts on Bibliomania are © Ltd, and may not be reproduced in any form without our written permission. See our FAQ for more details.